Monday, 14 March 2016

Light Transport / Light Sampling debug visualisation

I've just finished implementing the first pass of the ability to record events that happen during light transport, and visualise them in Imagine's OpenGL viewer. I'd been having issues with light sampling issues with complex light setups with many lights, and just looking at the code and debugging what was going on from within gdb wasn't really getting me anywhere.

So I decided that as Imagine has a GUI (in non-embedded mode, anyway), it would be fairly easy to record events like path vertices, light sample positions, etc, during light transport and then later display them in the viewer. I ended up creating a separate DebugRenderer integrator for this, which I'm not completely happy with as it means code duplication in order to replicate light transport and light sampling, but integrating this event recording (at a fine grained level) brought with it some time overheads - definitely when recording events, as expected, but it was also even slightly noticeable when it was turned off in the light sampling code, presumably due to extra branching - but more importantly it complicated the existing code quite a bit, so for the moment I'm going to keep it like this.

It's allowed me to very easily identify issues with spherical analytical light sampling in Imagine as well identifying some other light sampling issues, and with some future improvements to support volume scattering events as well as better view-time filtering (to allow constraining the preview of these events to useful subsections), it should be better still.

The below images show the rendered scene and the visualisation of a sub-set of rays hitting the top of a cube for the first hit event from the camera: blue lines are camera rays, green lines are successful next event estimation rays which found a light and red lines show next event estimation rays which were occluded.
It can also show unsampleable light samples (backfacing), secondary bounce rays (tagged/coloured diffuse, glossy or specular) and exit rays which didn't hit anything in the scene.



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