Monday, 26 May 2014

Complex Shading and UDIM Texture Atlas support

I did some prototyping of two different shading implementations which allow vastly more flexible shading than Imagine's previous baked-BSDF approach. The two different methods I tested really only varied in how the memory for the dynamic BSDF components was allocated and used - both methods built the BSDF components after each geometry intersection (for non-shadow rays - in my final implementation it's also performed when Transparent shadows are enabled), either from constant values or textures. The first test method was using a memory arena to allocate the samples, and the second was allocating the memory on the stack within the integrator loops.

Fairly comprehensive benchmarking - using a worst-case scenario: allocating lots of different BSDFs all driven from image textures, and all controlled by quite convoluted and expensive branching logic - showed that between the two methods, in terms of speed, there was practically no difference. However, there was (as I expected) an overhead to doing this compared to the baked BSDF approach - generally around 4-9% overhead total render time. The extreme end of this I'm putting down to image texture evaluations (all images in the tests were memory-resident, so with texture paging and displacement the overhead could be even higher), and the lower end is probably the additional branching for controlling the BSDF creation now being called for every ray bounce instead of just once. Because of this, and the fact that there didn't seem to be any overhead in just having the stack based dynamic BSDF components in the integrator loops if I didn't use them, I decided to use this second approach which allowed me to still use the baked BSDF approach if the material definition was simple enough to allow it. This allows great flexibility but at the cost of some code complexity, but I think that's a worthwhile trade-off.

So now any float/Col3f material parameter can be driven by textures, and a decision is made per-material at pre-render time whether complex shading is needed on a per-material basis. If not, the material will pre-bake the BSDF as previously, and within the integrators, this baked BSDF is returned by the material shade() function and used.

If complex shading is needed, then the material can make use of the pointer to the stack-allocated BSDF memory which is passed in to the shade() function, allocate BSDF components as required using this memory and then return this pointer to the integrators. The base infrastructure is now in place for node-based shading networks - the GUI side of things for that is the main work required to complete this.

Based on this new functionality, I implemented a MixMaterial ability to mix or binary-switch materials based on a texture.

I also added UDIM texture atlas support with lazy on-demand reading of textures based on the UV coordinates.


No comments:

Post a Comment